Here are a few GIFs of procedurally generated architecture by a game developer named Cedric, built using Unity. Cedric describes himself as an “indie game dev focused on social AI, emergent narrative and procedural worlds.” (via BLDGBLOG: Procedural Brutalism)

Here are a few GIFs of procedurally generated architecture by a game developer named Cedric, built using Unity. Cedric describes himself as an “indie game dev focused on social AI, emergent narrative and procedural worlds.” (via BLDGBLOG: Procedural Brutalism)

None more Glitch.
The M.C. Escher World of Memories of a Broken Dimension

(Source: youtube.com)

(Source: puppy-cemetery)

(Source: guardian-corps)

fluorescent-black:

5/9/2014 18:00 CET —

prostheticknowledge:

Cyborg Unplug

Plug in anti surveillance device that detects and stops potential data infringement in your workplace:

Cyborg Unplug is a wireless anti-surveillance system for the home and workplace. ‘Plug to Unplug’, it detects and kicks devices known to pose a risk to personal privacy from your local wireless network, breaking uploads and streams. Detected devices currently include: Google Glass, Dropcam, small drones/copters, wireless ‘spy’ microphones and various other network-dependent surveillance devices.

Cyborg Unplug comes hot on the heels of glasshole.sh, a script written by Julian Oliver to detect and disconnect Google’s Glass device from a locally owned and administered network. Following broad coverage in the press, the script struck a chord with countless people all over the world that felt either frustrated or threatened by the growing use and abuse of covert, camera-enabled computer technology.

Available to pre-order on 30th September

More Here

styledeficit:

"I wonder what stupid thing they’ve called it?" I thought to myself. I live in a house with a Dyson Air Multiplier. If you don’t, just assume that I have a lot more air in my house than you do. What else would an ‘Air Multiplier’ do, but multiply the amount of air you have? Should you need…

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As the probe deepened inside Nasdaq’s headquarters and its data center, investigators had to reconstruct the path of world-class hackers whose job depended on being untraceable. The team was surprised at how vulnerable a sophisticated operation such as Nasdaq could be. “Our assumption was that, generally speaking, the financial sector had its act together much more,” says Christopher Finan, a former cybersecurity expert in the Obama White House. “It doesn’t mean that they’re perfect, but on a spectrum they’re near the top.”

What the investigators found inside Nasdaq shocked them, according to both law enforcement officials and private contractors hired by the company to aid in the investigation. Agents found the tracks of several different groups operating freely, some of which may have been in the exchange’s networks for years, including criminal hackers and Chinese cyberspies. Basic records of the daily activity occurring on the company’s servers, which would have helped investigators trace the hackers’ movements, were almost nonexistent. Investigators also discovered that the website run by One Liberty Plaza’s building management company had been laced with a Russian-made exploit kit known as Blackhole, infecting tenants who visited the page to pay bills or do other maintenance.

What one investigator referred to as “the dirty swamp” of Nasdaq’s computer banks made following the trail of the Russian malware excruciatingly slow. The agents figured the hackers first broke into Nasdaq’s computers at least three months before they were detected, but that was just a guess. There were indications that a large cache of data was stolen, though proof was scarce, and it was hard to see what was spirited out. “If someone breaks into your house, trying to figure where they went and what they took is pretty difficult because, unlike a bank, you don’t have cameras in your house, you don’t have motion sensors,” says Jason Syversen, chief executive officer of Siege Technologies, a security firm in Manchester, N.H. “In terms of cybersecurity, most companies are more like a house than a bank.”

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